South Hams District Council is cracking down on dog owners who have their dogs off the lead in public areas, or who don’t clean up after their dogs.

Public Space Protection Orders have been introduced across the South Hams, clarifying where it will be mandatory to keep dogs on a lead. In some areas, such as children’s play areas, dogs are banned entirely.In addition, the new laws give authorised council officers the power to request that an owner place their dog on a lead in any open public area where the dog is causing a nuisance or likely to do so.During the summer months, dogs are not permitted on a number of beaches in the South Hams, and officers will be able to issue on the spot fines for those ignoring this regulation.Failure to comply with the PSPO or a request from a council officer is punishable by an on-the-spot fine of £100.
Uniformed Officers will be patrolling regularly from early July.

Where must I have my dog on a lead in Kingsbridge?

Good dog ownership & common sense dictate that dogs should be on a lead near roads, livestock, wildlife and any area or activity where close control is needed.

Dogs must be on a lead (The Anti-Social Behaviour Crime and Policing Act 2014, Public Spaces Protection Order 2017; Control of Dogs) in the following locations:

  • Car parks.
  • Cemeteries and Churchyards.
  • Marked sports fields whilst organised sport is in progress.

AND:

Formal gardens listed as:

  • Kingsbridge Quayside and Market Square (including bandstand)
  • Recreation ground, Kingsbridge including the Embankment footpath and grass strip to include the Town Square
  • The Slipway, Quay Car Park, Kingsbridge
  • Bus Station, Kingsbridge
  • All public footpaths within Kingsbridge town boundary

Dogs on Leads by Direction

An authorised Council Officer will have the power to request that an owner place their dog on a lead in any open public area where the dog is causing a nuisance or likely to do so.

Failure to comply with these directions could result in a Fixed Penalty Notice of £100 or a fine of up to £1000 if the matter goes to Court.